Best TVs of 2024: Tested and reviewed

At Tom's Guide, we're always hunting for the best TV. As new models come out, we put them through a rigorous testing regiment, all to help you make the best decision you can possibly make when shopping for a new OLED or QLED TV. We test all the top TVs each year — close to four dozen of them — and these are the 4K TVs that we recommend. 

What are we looking for when we review the best TVs? We want everything that you want: great picture quality, rich sound, easy setup, and all of the smart features available today. We take all those metrics and weigh them against the price of the TV to help you decide what's worth your money.

To evaluate each TV, we test them in our labs and in the real world, measuring everything from color reproduction and color accuracy to lag time for gaming performance. Plus, we gauge picture and sound quality by watching some of the most popular shows and movies. 

So what are the best TVs available now? Based on our testing recently named the Hisense U8K to the top spot due to its on-going affordability and phenomenal performance. Other top-scoring models like the LG G3 OLED and Samsung QN90C still hold high rankings on our list, but we wanted to place a higher emphasis on more affordable models.

Speaking of LG's OLED TVs, the company just announced the pricing of its G4 and C4 OLED TVs, with pre-orders available now. With the LG C4 OLED, Hisense UX (2024), TCL QM8 (2024) and Samsung QN90D all expected to launch in the next two months, it's worth keeping a close eye on this page as we work our way through the best TVs 2024 has to offer.

Written by
Nick Pino is the Managing Editor, TV and AV at Tom's Guide
Written by
Nick Pino

My name's Nick and I look after our guides to the best TVs, best OLED TVs and best 4K TVs. Most of my day is spent watching and evaluating new screens from LG, Samsung, Sony, Hisense, TCL and Vizio. I have 10 years of experience in AV, and before I joined Tom's Guide I was formerly the Senior Editor, TV and AV at TechRadar. I love helping people find the perfect TV, so please feel free to reach out over email or tag me on Twitter and I can help you out.

The quick list

The best TVs you can buy today

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Best TV

The Hisense U8K offers the best bang for your buck

Specifications

Available Screen Sizes: 55, 65, 75 inches
Screen Type: Mini-LED
Refresh Rate: 120 Hz
HDMI ports: 4 HDMI (2 HDMI 2.1)
Size: 57.2 × 35.9 × 14.8 inches
Weight: 56.4 pounds

Reasons to buy

+
Extremely bright
+
Incredibly colorful
+
Great sound quality
+
Built-in ATSC 3.0 tuner

Reasons to avoid

-
Color accuracy can be an issue
-
Not the lowest lag
-
Colors desaturate off-axis
Buy it if

✅ You want a Mini-LED TV for its performance: Its peak brightness exceeds any TV around that price, and its color reproduction is as good as some of this year’s best TVs. 

You use Google devices and services: Google TV is smart and well-rounded, especially for those in Google’s ecosystem, and who already use services like Google Assistant.

✅ You want a TV with good sound: Audio performance is a lot like the HDR performance — it’s great. The U8K's 2.1.2 speaker system is plenty powerful for most medium-sized living rooms.

Don't buy it if:

❌ You care about color accuracy: Colors, while vibrant, aren’t going to look all that natural.

❌ You want a super-fast gaming TV: Anything lower than 20 milliseconds is considered nearly imperceptible, but it does mean that serious gamers will be better served with one of the other TVs on that table.

❌ You have a big family that gather around the TV:   Colors will desaturate as you shift off-axis. This is relatively common for Mini-LED TVs so it’s not anything surprising, but it’s an area that companies like Hisense will have to improve upon

The bottom line

📺 The Hisense U8K ULED is one of the most colorful TVs we’ve tested and puts out above average light for its price point. There’s room for improvement here — especially when it comes to input lag and color accuracy — but the U8K vastly improves on the Hisense U8H from 2022. ★★★★

What you need to know
The Hisense U8K sits at the top of our list of the best TVs because it offers an incredible bang for your buck. Its deep, rich colors, high level of contrast and high peak brightness put it well-above any other TV at this price point. What's more, we find this TV works in almost any living room, even one with lots of ambient light. Thanks to its Mini-LED lighting, colors don't desaturate as you move off-axis, and its  Full Array Local Dimming panel helps the TV retain good black levels in scenes with higher levels of brightness. In our testing, we measured its color saturation levels at a groundbreaking 80% of the Rec2020 Color Space, all thanks to its quantum dot filter and Mini-LED panel. In short, the U8K performs like a TV twice the cost.

So why doesn't it get a perfect 5 out of 5 score from us? Well, it does have its faults, as you'd expect from any TV under $1,000. It has a middling input lag (13.2ms) and its Google TV smart platform can be slightly slow when when jumping from one streaming app to another. Also, although the TV has a very wide color gamut, its accuracy right out of the box is around 4.46 (measured by a Delta E value). 

These issues are unlikely to affect your enjoyment of the TV, but it does show that there's still room for improvement here. If you want a TV that has faster response times or more accurate colors (and you don't mind paying more for it) then the Sony A95L or Samsung S90C OLED found lower on our list are worth buying instead.

Design: For our tests, we used a 65-inch model. At 56.4 pounds this TV is relatively hefty and will require two people to put into place, especially if you plan on wall-mounting. To mount, make sure you buy a 400mm x 400mm VESA Wall Mount Standard which, thankfully, shouldn't be hard to find as it's relatively common. If you want to simply place it on top of an entertainment center, you can do that using the two included legs that come in the box. The U8K allows for two different leg configurations, a wider stance and a narrower one, to accommodate different spaces. We highly recommend using the wider stance whenever possible to reduce the possibility of the TV tipping over.

Performance: We were incredibly impressed with the Hisense U8K's performance. In our lab tests, conducted by Tom's Guide's Head of Testing Matthew Murray, the Hisense U8K was able to go toe-to-toe with the much more expensive Samsung QN90C and even surpasses it in some key metrics like SDR brightness and color saturation. It cannot be understated how impressive this is. 

As we mentioned earlier, the biggest issue in terms of performance is the Hisense U8K's color accuracy — it performed worse out-of-the-box than the Samsung QN90C or the rival LG C3 OLED. This can be fixed with some fine-tuning or proper calibration, but just aware that right out of the box colors can look a bit oversaturated. Serious gamers might also notice the smallest bit of latency. Anything under 20 milliseconds is nearly imperceptible to the human eye, but there are other TVs that have a hair less input lag for a slightly more responsive feel.

Smart TV: We genuinely like Google TV as a smart platform and we think you will, too. It does a phenomenal job at surfacing new and recommended content for you to watch and it has access to all the main streaming services. Even better, it doesn't really push you to use one service over another the same way an Amazon Fire TV might. The only potential issue is that you might notice a bit of a slowdown when you switch from one streaming app to the next.  

Read the full review: Hisense U8K Mini-LED TV

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Rating scorecard
AttributesNotesRating
PriceStrong performance for the price.★★★★☆
DesignA great-looking TV but not OLED-levels of thin.★★★★☆
PerformanceShows and movies give off a serious ‘wow’ factor.★★★★★
Smart TVThe best smart TV operating system on the market.★★★★★

Best OLED TV

Samsung dethrones LG as the top OLED TV

Specifications

Available Screen Sizes: 55, 65, 77 inches
Screen Type: OLED
Refresh Rate: 120 Hz
HDMI ports: 4 HDMI 2.1 (1 eARC)
Size: 56.8 x 32.7 x 0.4 inches
Weight: 41.7 pounds

Reasons to buy

+
One Connect box for cable management
+
Impressive brightness
+
Works as a SmartThings/Matter controller

Reasons to avoid

-
No Dolby Vision
-
Built-in audio is average
Buy it if

✅ Outstanding brightness: The S95C’s peak brightness of 1,370 nits puts it solidly in LED territory.
✅ Great for gamers and sports fans: 120Hz native refresh rate with four HDMI 2.1 ports makes this great for both gamers and sports fans alike. This set pairs well with the PS5 and Xbox Series X.
✅ Neural Quantum Processor 4K: Samsung's top processor provides excellent upscaling of HD content to Ultra HD, along with great motion processing.

Don't buy it if:

❌ You care about Dolby Vision: Dolby Vision is, by far, the best HDR format. It's tuned to match the brightness and black levels of each individual scene, so not having it on a TV this nice is a bummer.

❌Sound quality is lackluster: With a picture so phenomenal, it's a bit disappointing that the sound isn't as jaw-dropping. It's not bad, certainly, but it lacks refinement.

The bottom line

📺 The Samsung S95C OLED is a jaw-dropping TV. If you have the money to buy one of the best TVs out there, the Samsung S95C deserves a look as it takes QD-OLED to new heights. ★★★★★

What you need to know
Samsung's return to the world of OLED TVs has been a wild ride. It was one of the first manufacturers to make an OLED TV before dejecting the technology in place of QLED. Now, with the S95C OLED, Samsung proves it can do both perfectly. 

Not only is its picture performance simply stunning, but when you’re not watching or using the TV, Ambient mode takes over and provides a carousel of aesthetically-pleasing animations and images. Samsung made Ambient mode mainstream, and though other TV brands have since introduced their own spin on it, we still like Samsung’s version the best.

We wish Samsung would implement Dolby Vision and maybe pump up the sound quality a bit more on the S95C, but overall, it's still an incredible QD-OLED TV.

Design: The Samsung S95C is a premium model, through and through. It uses metal materials, a bezel-less screen and has an impressively thin panel. It’s even thinner than the S95B, measuring a mere 10mm thick. If you like your TVs slim and sleek, but still able to fit on a home entertainment center with ease, the S95C's design is top notch. In terms of ports, the S95C has four HDMI 2.1 ports plus an ATSC 3.0 tuner.

Performance: Our reviewers loved the picture of the Samsung S95C OLED, citing its nuanced HDR performance, out-of-the-box color accuracy and wonderful black levels. In our tests, the S95C was able to reproduce about 141.5% of the Rec 709 color space in standard mode and a Delta-E accuracy score of 1.4 (with closer to 0 being best) in Filmmaker mode. For gamers, the S95C measured an excellent 9.2ms lag time, the lowest input latency of any TV we tested, and the set’s off-angle viewing is better than most, with the colors holding up well past the ideal 45 degrees. 

Smart TV: Samsung's Tizen OS is a bit of a mixed bag this year. It can be difficult to navigate (especially if you wan to make tweaks to your picture settings), but you can still find all the major streaming apps, plus plenty of free content from Samsung TV Plus. On the plus side, the S95C can act as a SmartThings hub. If you’re growing your smart home or embracing the Matter smart home protocol, this TV control all of your devices, even if your home uses gadgets from all different manufacturers. 

Read the full review: Samsung S95C OLED

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Rating scorecard
AttributesNotesRating
PriceA little pricey, but well-worth the cost of entry.★★★★☆
DesignA familiar, yet stunning piece of hardware.★★★★★
PerformanceBetter and brighter picture than previous OLEDs.★★★★★
Smart TVTizen can be a bit finnicky. ★★★☆☆

The best value TV

Our bargain pick is an excellent, affordable QLED with Google TV

Specifications

Available Screen Sizes: 65, 75, 85, 98 inches
Screen Type: QLED
Refresh Rate: 120 Hz
HDMI ports: 4 HDMI (1 eARC)
Size: 56.9 x 32.6 x 1.7 inches
Weight: 50.1 pounds

Reasons to buy

+
Extraordinary brightness
+
Numerous gaming features
+
Google TV smart platform

Reasons to avoid

-
Mediocre sound
-
Picture quality dips in some situations
-
No ATSC 3.0 tuner
Buy it if

✅ You want a cheap TV that still looks good: For the best smart TV experience in a TV under $1,000, it's hard to deny that the TCL QM8 is the best option around.

You demand good image quality: This TV offers better color, brightness, and shorter lag times than the previous Roku model. Color reproduction was an impressive  99.97% of the Rec 709 color space.

✅ You want a TV that comes with Google TV: It's also snappy, offering noticeably quicker and smoother operations than other platforms, including the sometimes slow Roku TV software that many TCL smart TVs use.

Don't buy it if:

❌ You sit off-axis to the TV: You want to be sitting head-on with this TV. Sit too far off to one side, and you're going to lose a significant amount of color saturation.

❌ You want great-sounding audio: The TV is only outfitted with a pair of 8-watt speakers that merely offer passable stereo sound and decent volume. You might want a good soundbar.

You need more than two HDMI 2.1 ports: Although it has a refresh rate of 120Hz, only two of its HDMI ports offer full-spec 2.1 compliance for 4K/120fps gameplay.

The bottom line

📺 The TCL QM8 Mini-LED TV is a solid upgrade on the beloved 6-Series, and it deserves its spot on our list for offering incredible performance for a very reasonable price. ★★★★

What you need to know
It was a really close call between the Hisense U8K and the TCL QM8. Both TVs are extraordinary values for the money, and while we do think the Hisense U8K is the overall better pick, the TCL QM8 deserved a spot on our list as well. Like the Hisense U8K, the QM8 uses Mini-LEDs for better backlight control and quantum dots to enhance contrast and color. With up to 2,300 local dimming zones and TCL's High Brightness Ultra Direct LED backlight, you're going to get unbelievable contrast for an LED-LCD TV. We also really like the AIPQ Engine Gen 3 that helps upscale HD/SDR content for the QM8's 4K screen as well as the TV's numerous gaming features.

The only major drawbacks here are the TV's 8W speakers that can feel a bit underwhelming and the lack of an ATSC 3.0 tuner that can be found in the Hisense U8K. The latter isn't a deal-breaker, especially if you don't plan on using a digital antenna, but it's absence is still felt here.

Design: The QM8 may not have the beautiful slim design of the LG G3 OLED, but it's certainly not a bad design, either. Its minimal bezel that measures in a less than an eighth-inch on all sides maximizes screen real estate. Beneath the bottom of the screen are physical controls as well as a switch for turning on or off the far-field microphone. The TCL QM8 offers four HDMI ports, however only two of them are HDMI 2.1-compliant, meaning you'll have to choose which devices can pass 4K/120Hz signal and which ones can't. 

Performance: The QM8, like the U8K, is a good pick if you need higher-than-average brightness to combat ambient light. In our testing, the TCL QM8 was able to hit 1,348 nits in Movie mode with SDR content, a significant increase over other 4K HDR TVs that we've measured. With HDR content, the QM8 was able to hit above 2,000 nits in a 5%, 10% and even 25% window sizes. This brightness paired with the Mini-LED backlight offers great contrast that approaches OLED levels. Colors are vivid as well, with our tests showing that the QM8 can cover 80% of the BT2020 color spectrum. Just like the U8K, however, its out-the-box color accuracy leaves a lot to be desired with a Delta E score of 4.4614. With some tweaking, this number can drop significantly, but it's worth noting that some colors might appear a bit oversaturated when you first start it up.

Smart TV: Like a lot of other manufacturers, TCL has shifted to using Google TV in its 2023 models, including the QM8. Google TV is clean and runs smooth on this model, and thanks to the remote's built-in microphone and the TV's integrated microphone, you can search for shows and movies using only your voice. If you want some privacy, you can turn off the voice assistant via a physical switch on the TV itself.

Read the full review: TCL QM8 Mini-LED TV

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Rating scorecard
AttributesNotesRating
PriceGreat value for your dollar.★★★★★
DesignIts basic plastic construction does the job.★★★★☆
PerformanceImproved performance and a strong 4K HDR TV.★★★★★
Smart TVThe best smart TV system on the market.★★★★★

The best QLED TV

You can't go wrong with Samsung's QN90C

Specifications

Available Screen Sizes: 43, 50, 55, 65, 75, 85 inches
Screen Type: QLED
Refresh Rate: 120 Hz
HDMI ports: 4 HDMI 2.1
Size: 56.9 x 32.6 x 1.1 inches
Weight: 53.4 pounds

Reasons to buy

+
4 HDMI 2.1 ports
+
Excellent off-angle viewing
+
Spectacularly bright
+
Less blooming than previous model

Reasons to avoid

-
No Dolby Vision support
-
Included stand isn’t very sturdy
Buy it if

✅ You want better brightness than OLED: OLED is the king of contrast, but any ambient light can wash out the picture. Samsung's QLED TVs can handle more ambient light than almost any other TV because of its high peak brightness.

✅ Eye-popping colors and clarity: Yes brightness is important to counter glare, but it's also important in color reproduction and clarity. Better brightness, brighter colors.

✅ Great for gamers: Most TVs on this list are great for gamers, but the Samsung QN90C might be one of the best for PS5 and Xbox Series X due to its low input lag.

Don't buy it if:

❌ You care about Dolby Vision: Dolby Vision is, by far, the best HDR format. It's tuned to match the brightness and black levels of each individual scene, so not having it on a TV this nice is a bummer.

❌ You're afraid of your TV tipping over: The central stand doesn’t offer as much stability as we typically expect. Samsung transitioned to a hexagonal base design that uses less space, but that seems to have come at a cost.

The bottom line

📺 The Samsung QN90C Neo QLED TV has all the hallmarks of a premium TV: best-in-class HDR brightness, ample viewing options and strong picture performance. ★★★★★

What you need to know
The Samsung QN90C is the swiss army knife of TVs. It's good at basically everything, from upscaling content to boosting brightness, and it's available in pretty much every screen size fathomable. Whether you want a 43-inch telly for your office or guest bedroom, or you need an 85-inch behemoth for your living room, you can find a QN90C model to match. Like our top picks, the Samsung QN90C uses Mini-LED for better contrast and a higher peak brightness. Unlike our other top picks it has a slightly faster input latency and four full-spec HDMI 2.1 ports that can pass 4K/120Hz signal that make it a better pick for gamers. 

The downside here is that you're paying a lot more for this slight improvement on performance and its lackluster Tizen smart platform. It's still worth considering for all those extras, but it doesn't exactly provide the best value compared to our top picks.

Design: Visually, the Samsung QN90C won't blow you away — its pillar stand is a bit ugly compared to other screens that use two wide feet, and its minimalistic design doesn't do much to separate itself from the pack. The major difference between the QN90C and the slightly pricier QN95C model is Samsung’s One Connect Box that helps hide the wires running into the back of the TV. For a cleaner look, the QN95C really nails it, but you can achieve a similar effect on the QN90C with some carefully placed zip ties. The good news is that the QN90C has four HDMI 2.1 ports, one of which can be used as the eARC port for soundbars. For gamers, HDMI 2.1 ports enable 4K/120Hz pass-through as well as Auto Low Latency Mode and Variable Refresh Rate. Have we mentioned that this is a great gaming TV?

Performance: While other models from Hisense and TCL have finally caught up to Samsung in terms of peak brightness, the QN90C is a strong performer when it comes to light output. In the relatively balanced Filmmaker mode, the QN90C was able to reached 1987.34 nits in a 10% window. That's roughly a 5% increase over last year's excellent QN90B QLED and over twice the peak brightness of the LG C3 OLED that you'll find a little lower on our list. As mentioned above, the Hisense U8K came close to the Samsung QN90C's light output and the Samsung was able to best the U8K in terms of color accuracy right out of the box. The QN90C is slightly more expensive, but it doesn't require nearly as much fiddling in the settings to get the color dialed in correctly.

Smart TV: There's nothing outright wrong with Samsung's proprietary Tizen smart TV platform. It's fully functional with all the mainstream streaming services as well as a nifty smart home hub for any SmartThings devices you might own. If you don't own any SmartThings devices, however, then Tizen really doesn't present many advantages and its relatively complex settings menu can be confusing to navigate. Having some free content in the way of the Samsung TV Plus streaming service makes up for that slightly, but by and large we think Google TV is the better option to go for if we had the choice between the two platforms.

Read the full review: Samsung QN90C Neo QLED TV

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Rating scorecard
AttributesNotesRating
PriceA bit more affordable than Samsung's 2023 flagship TV.★★★★★
DesignFlush bezels and 1-inch wide body.★★★★☆
PerformanceBest-in-class brightness and impressive performance★★★★★
Smart TVNot the best, not the worst.★★★★☆

Best Cheap TV

One of the best budget TVs in years

Specifications

Available Screen Sizes: 55, 65, 75 inches
Screen Type: QLED
Refresh Rate: 60 Hz
HDMI ports: 4 HDMI 2.0
Size: 57.1 x 33.1 x 3.1 inches
Weight: 43.1 pounds

Reasons to buy

+
Mini-LED display
+
Excellent color and contrast
+
65-inch under $500

Reasons to avoid

-
Only 60Hz refresh rate
-
No HDMI 2.1 ports
Buy it if

✅ You want a budget TV that looks great: Not that long ago, you got what you paid for with budget TVs but the Hsense U6 performs well outside its price range.
✅ You want a Mini-LED TV with awesome HDR: Hisense’s implementation of Mini-LED enables better contrast with above-par black levels and a quantum dot for color saturation.
✅ You want better black levels: The U6’s Mini-LED panel allows it to put dark shadows next to bright highlights without noticeable haloing and ensures a lower likelihood of the dreaded Dirty Screen Effect from non-uniform lighting elements.

Don't buy it if:

❌ You're looking for a gaming TV: Gamers might want to look elsewhere as the U6K's 60Hz panel and lack of HDMI 2.1 ports mean it has a distinctly last-gen feel to it.
❌ You need great sound quality out of the box: The Hisense U6’s speakers are good for the price but aren’t going to blow you away.
❌ You want OLED quality at a discount: Is the picture as sumptuous as what you’d get from an OLED screen? No. But for a TV priced this way, there was absolutely nothing to complain about.

The bottom line

📺 The Hisense U6K delivers an outstanding picture for its price tag. Its Mini-LED backlighting offers spectacular contrast while its quantum dot filter ensures well-saturated colors. For under $500, this is the best TV you can buy.  ★★★★

What you need to know
Hisense is a brand that's all about providing value for your dollar, hence why the U8K is so highly rated on Tom's Guide. The Hisense U6K keeps a lot of what makes the U8K so great, namely its Mini-LED backlight that enables better contrast with above-par black levels and a quantum dot filter for enhanced color saturation. The Hisense U6K trades the U8K's native 120Hz panel for one with a 60Hz refresh rate but, considering that this TV is often priced below $500, it's a tradeoff most folks should be fine with. 

So why isn't this one the best TV of the year if it's such a good value? The U6K doesn't have as powerful of a processor on-board, which means that upscaling and motion processing are mediocre at best. Its lack of any HDMI 2.1 ports means gamers will be stuck at 4K/60, and there's no ATSC 3.0 tuner here, either.

For under $500, it's the best cheap TV we think you can buy, but it's important you know why it's sitting down here on our list instead of at the number-one spot.

Design: Admittedly, the Hisense U6K probably isn't the chicest TV you're ever going to lay eyes on — its legs are plastic and 3.1 inches deep, it doesn’t sit exactly flat on the wall. Still, I don't think it looks awful, either, especially when you’re actually watching something on the TV. The bigger issue in terms of design is the HDMI 2.0b ports and 60Hz panel that won't maximize the graphical prowess of the Xbox Series X and PS5. If you're not a gamer, this isn't a huge deal, but it's something that we noted in our review.

Performance: You've heard it before, but Mini-LED is clutch here, helping the Hisense U6K punch well above its weight in terms of performance. The U6K doesn't have as many full array local dimming zones as the U8K to control the brightness, but we were impressed by how bright the U6K got in our testing. It was able to beat out pretty much every other budget model minus the Roku Plus Series. The downside, again, is that upscaling can be hit-or-miss here, and you'll probably notice some fuzziness as you watch HD/SDR content from an OTA antenna or cable box. The other issue we had is that, despite this being a strong performer with color when we sat directly in front of it, you will notice some desaturation as you move off-axis, so maybe don't buy this as your main living room TV.

Smart TV: The Hisense U6K is another Google TV, much like the higher-priced U8K. All of the same benefits apply here in terms of the personalized recommendations and nicely curated rows of new content. The U6K was a bit sluggish out of the box, which was a bit worrying, and we did hit some snafus when perusing Disney Plus. It's not guaranteed that you'll have the same problems, but it's worth mentioning here just in case you run into them yourself.

Read the full review: Hisense U6K Mini-LED TV

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Rating scorecard
AttributesNotesRating
PriceCompared against its more expensive rivals, the Hisense U6K is an outstanding bargain★★★★★
DesignThe Hisense U6 does little to hide its budget aesthetic.★★★☆☆
PerformanceThe Hisense U6K delivers an outstanding picture for its price tag.★★★★☆
Smart TVWhile it looks exactly the same here as it does on upper-end models, Google TV does run a bit more…erratic on the Hisense U6.★★★☆☆

The best QD-OLED TV

If it was a tad cheaper, the A95L would be the best TV in the world

Specifications

Available Screen Sizes: 55, 65, 77
Screen Type: QD-OLED
Refresh Rate: 120 Hz
HDMI ports: 4 (2 HDMI 2.1, 2 HDMI 2.0)
Size: 56.9 x 32.8 x 1.4 inches
Weight: 51.6 pounds

Reasons to buy

+
Remarkable picture quality
+
Superb sound
+
Google TV interface
+
Attractive, useful remote control
+
Equipped with ATSC 3.0 tuner

Reasons to avoid

-
Only two HDMI 2.1 ports
-
Not the lowest input lag you can find
-
Relatively high input lag
Buy it if

✅ You want the best of both OLED and QLED: QD-OLED tech delivers a TV that's both bright and has near-perfect contrast.

✅ Design really matters to you: It bears repeating: the screen measures a trifle more than one-eighth inch thick. If you like that whole floating screen look, this TV has it.

✅ You want good out-of-the-box sound: The A95L can't beat a standalone soundbar, but music, dialogue, and sound effects sound crisp and clear.

Don't buy it if:

You care about low latency: Gamers might be turned off by the above average amount of input latency (16.2ms).

You want more than two HDMI 2.1 ports: Unfortunately, the Sony A95L only has two full-spec HDMI 2.1 ports available.

You want a cheap TV: Cutting-edge technology often comes at a premium cost, and the A95L is no exception.

The bottom line

📺 The Sony Bravia A95L OLED TV would've taken the crown had it not be the most expensive TV we tested in 2023. If you have a wallet thick enough, though, everything you watch on it will be a transcendent viewing and listening experience. ★★★★★

What you need to know
If someone asked us which TV we'd buy for ourselves if we had an unlimited budget and a perfect spot in a dedicated home theater space, the Sony Bravia A95L OLED would be the TV we'd pick. It is so genuinely good, that it could put any other TV on this list to shame...too bad the pricing starts at around $3,000 for one. 

So what makes this Sony OLED the superlative screen? It offers the best picture performance with outlandish color vibrancy and accuracy, plus a surprisingly high peak brightness and a beautiful-sounding audio system. Its Google TV platform is identical to all the others on this list, but PS5 owners will get an expanded set of features by pairing their Sony console with this Sony TV. 

It's a shame it's so bloody expensive because this is a TV that everyone in the world deserves to see at some point in their lives.

Design: The A95L is a conundrum: It's a beautiful TV that's super slim (about 0.25 inch at its thinnest point) but also relatively big generally speaking. It's also heavier than other OLED TVs (the 65-inch model weighs 51.6 pounds) and you'll never know fear until you're lifting a paper-thin, $3,000 TV to get it onto a wall-mount. Once it's properly mounted, however, it looks great. The major downside here is that the HDMI 2.1 ports are limited in availability here with only two to choose from. 

Performance: You wouldn't know it by its name, but the A95L is a QD-OLED TV that uses both organic light-emitting diodes (made from Deuterium, most likely) and a quantum dot filter applied in between the screen and the panel. In combination, they offer better color vibrancy and expanded brightness on top of the perfect black levels you've come to expect from OLED. What Sony adds to the mix, however, is its Cognitive Processor XR that is absolutely brilliant at processing motion and upscaling sub-4K video. It's arguably the best processor in the world right now, though I'm sure Samsung and LG would wildly disagree with that statement. The results speak for themselves, however. Anything and everything looks incredible on the A95L. From games to movies and TV shows, there's not one thing that doesn't look great on it.

Smart TV: Good TVs are made even better by their smart platforms, and the A95L is no exception. Thanks to the A95L's system on a chip (SoC), Google TV runs fast and fluid, with no noticeable hitches or slowdowns. With so much power under the hood we're not expecting to see any problems for years to come, either.

Read the full review: Sony Bravia XR A95L

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Rating scorecard
AttributesNotesRating
PriceIt's steep.★★☆☆☆
DesignThis set’s svelteness is impressive.★★★★★
PerformanceNext-generation picture quality (mostly).★★★★★
Smart TVSimple, clean, and rich.★★★★★

The best TV for gaming

A 144Hz gaming TV with VRR that's made for consoles and PCs

Specifications

Available Screen Sizes: 55, 65, 77, 83 inches
Screen type: QD-OLED
Refresh rate: 144 Hz
HDMI ports: 4 HDMI 2.1
Size: 57.0 x 33.1 x 3.5 inches
Weight: 46.5 pounds

Reasons to buy

+
Gorgeous picture quality
+
Excellent gaming features
+
Decent audio for a TV

Reasons to avoid

-
No Dolby Vision support
-
Tizen is somewhat clunky
Buy it if

Eye-popping colors and clarity: Yes brightness is important to counter glare, but it's also important in color reproduction and clarity. Better brightness, brighter colors. 

Great for gamers: Most TVs on this list are great for gamers, but the Samsung S90C is the best for PS5 and Xbox Series X due to its feature set, price and low input lag.

Don't buy it if:

You care about Dolby Vision: Dolby Vision is, by far, the best HDR format. It's tuned to match the brightness and black levels of each individual scene, so not having it on a TV this nice is a bummer.

The bottom line

📺 The Samsung S90C OLED is all about giving gamers everything they need for the best possible experience. Four HDMI 2.1 ports? Check. VRR, ALLM, 9.2ms response time? Check. Check. Check. ★★★★★

What you need to know
Gamers are spoilt for choices when it comes to picking out a TV. In fact, you could make the case for each and every model on this list that they'd be the best TV for gamers. But the Samsung S90C is the only one that meets every single spec: a low input lag (9.2ms), HDMI 2.1 allowing for VRR, ALLM, and up to 144Hz refresh rates. That's not even mentioning the new game-streaming options found on Tizen.

Obviously, the S90C is good for more than just gaming — it uses a QD-OLED panel after all. The result here is the same as in the Sony A95L OLED: Colors are more stunning and contrast looks incredible. The S90C does have a few trade-offs compared to the higher-end S95C (the OneConnect Box being one of them) but the price difference isn't worth paying in our opinion. 

For gamers, this is the be-all, end-all model.

Design: It might not have the OneConnect Box, but the Samsung S90C's still stocked up with four HDMI 2.1 ports that gamers will appreciate. The Samsung S90C's pedestal design has a few tricks up its sleeve, too. For one, it gives the illusion that the TV's floating in the air, an illusion that's all the more believable given the less than one-eighth inch bezel that surrounds the screen. Samsung's marketing name for this is "Infinity Display", but I think its minimalist beauty speaks for itself.  

Performance: Gaming is going to be a real bright spot for the Samsung S90C (we couldn't resist trying Starfield on it when we reviewed it) but it's no slouch when it comes to playing both SDR and HDR movies. In all of the above scenarios, the S90C demonstrated outstanding color reproduction, wide color gamut coverage and above-average brightness. Upscaled content looked great as did motion handling (after a bit of tweaking). There are few TVs that can compete with the Samsung S90C in terms of sheer performance prowess, so it gets full marks here.

Smart TV: Samsung's Tizen system is more than adequate for daily viewing. It has all the creature comforts you'd expect alongside a full roster of apps, and it ties into the Samsung SmartThings ecosystem, allowing you to control some smart home devices straight from the TV. We found its deeply convoluted settings difficult to use and expect you might feel the same way if you're someone who likes to tweak the picture, but for the most part Tizen gets the job done.

Read our full Samsung S90C OLED review

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Rating scorecard
AttributesNotesRating
PriceIt's not cheap, but it's fairly priced for its feature set.★★★★☆
DesignYou'd never know this beautiful TV was built with gamers in mind.★★★★★
PerformanceRich, precise colors and searing brightness.★★★★★
Smart TVTizen can be a bit unwieldy to navigate.★★★☆☆

The best mid-range TV

The mid-range OLED that won't break the bank

Specifications

Available Screen Sizes: 42, 48, 55, 65, 77, 83 inches
Screen Type: OLED
Refresh Rate: 120 Hz
HDMI ports: 4 HDMI 2.1 (1 eARC)
Size: 56.7 x 32.5 x 1.8 inches
Weight: 32.6 pounds

Reasons to buy

+
Superb picture quality
+
Improved smart interface
+
Top-notch gaming features, performance

Reasons to avoid

-
Not LG’s brightest OLED TV
-
No ATSC 3.0 tuner
-
Average-at-best sound
Buy it if

✅ You want an affordable OLED: This is one of the easiest-to-recommend TVs because it's affordable and offers such great performance.
✅ You plan on next-gen gaming: For gamers, the LG C3 OLED is a fantastic option, offering support for Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) and Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM),  HDMI 2.1, blue light reduction, Dark Room mode, and compatibility with Nvidia G-Sync and AMD FreeSync Premium.
✅ You care about how your TV looks: The C3 looks like a winner and comes with everything you’d want from a TV serving as your home entertainment centerpiece: perfect blacks, thrilling contrast, and rich, accurate colors at every point across the visual spectrum.

Don't buy it if:

❌ You don't mind settling for an older C2 OLED: If you have a C2, there aren’t light-years of difference here to make an upgrade a necessity. If you don't have an LG C2 OLED, you can find one for hundreds less than an LG C3 OLED.

❌ You want a TV with an ATSC 3.0 tuner: Without an ATSC 3.0 tuner, you won't be able to watch NextGen TV broadcasts from your local stations.

The bottom line

📺 The LG C3 OLED doesn't surpass the LG G3 OLED or Sony A95L, but it's a good middle-of-the-road option that gives you 90% of the performance for a discounted price. ★★★★

What you need to know
LG's C-Series OLED is a perennial favorite in the TV space. Each year, LG comes out with a few improvements to up picture performance (usually whatever technology was found in last year's G-Series model) and delivers it at a reasonable price. The C3 OLED only holds a lower position on our list this year because it's more expensive than new Mini-LED models from Hisense and TCL. 

So is the LG C3 OLED a bad TV? Not in the least. Once you watch an OLED TV, you'll have a hard time going back to a LED-LCD model. That's how good the black levels, color volume and even off-axis viewing are on an OLED TV. The C3 OLED is great for gamers due to its support of Nvidia G-Sync and AMD FreeSync Premium, plus WebOS continues to be a great alternative to Google TV. 

In a year where Hisense, TCL, Samsung and even LG itself didn't deliver such homerun TVs, the LG C3 would've been the best TV money could buy — and it still is if you want a mid-range screen that doesn't cost the world.

Design: The LG C3 OLED is stylish, but not revolutionary. It basically perfects the "slim-profile OLED TV on two legs" design LG's been making for years. It can of course be wall-mounted via 300x200mm VESA mounting holes, and that's our recommendation honestly, but it can of course sit pretty comfortably on a shelf and still look pretty cool. In terms of ports, all the main culprits are here with four HDMI 2.1 ports all with ALLM. Love it or hate it, the C3 also comes with LG's Magic Remote.

Performance: While the LG C3 doesn't use an all-new panel in 2023, it does have LG's new a9 AI Processor Gen6 powering the show. With it, upscaling is going to look better and motion will look sleeker (once you turn off TruMotion, that is). It's slightly dimmer than the QD-OLED TVs and LG G3 OLED that you'll find above, but what you're getting is still leagues ahead of where we were on the C8 or C9 from a few years ago. Better still, the C3 comes with built-in deterrents to burn-in, so you don't need to treat it with kid gloves if you want to watch TV for a few hours. Yes, it's going to be outperformed by models higher up on this list, but that's nothing to be ashamed of — the C3 OLED is still in the top 10 of TVs released in 2023.

Smart TV: There's nothing to dislike about LG's WebOS smart platform. It's Cas